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47 killed by virus transmitted by bats

47 killed by virus transmitted by bats

47 killed by virus transmitted by bats

Bats have been identified as carriers of the MERS coronavirus. So far, 47 people in the Middle East and Europe have died from it.

High mortality rate Bats from Saudi Arabia, according to experts, carry the dangerous coronavirus MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome). Since then, 47 people in the Middle East and Europe have died and 49 others have fallen ill. The mortality rate among infected people is thus almost 50 percent. Scientists have been studying the virus for 15 months, which was first identified in September 2012 in patients with a severe respiratory infection. According to “Bild.de”, researchers had examined animals in Eastern Europe and Africa with similar diseases. The breakthrough came when a bat was found in a grave in Egypt.

Extreme breathing problems It is now clear that it is a pathogen that can be assigned to the extremely dangerous corona viruses. These viruses caused extreme breathing problems in humans. Similarities were also found to the respiratory illness "SARS" discovered ten years ago in Asia, which at the time cost the lives of 800 people. However, the puzzle has not yet been finally solved, because the doctors know that the infected animal comes from the city of Bisha in Saudi Arabia, but it remains unclear how the disease was transmitted to humans.

Not as dangerous as SARS Since the bat that currently carries the germ does not bite humans, according to "Bild.de" it is suspected that the germ spreads through another animal host, such as sheep, goats, camels or cows, transfers to humans. The researchers would currently assume that MERS is not as dangerous as SARS. On the one hand, MERS mainly occurs in people who have previously had health problems, and on the other hand, it would rarely happen that people infected each other. (ad)

Photo credit: Gaiarama / pixelio.de

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Video: Bats as a Reservoir of Emerging Zoonotic Viruses (January 2021).